Tofu true love: Hiyayakko

8 Dec

Love of pure heart of tofu exist by name, Hiyayakko.

Best dishes for preparation by person like a topping in many variety

and pure taste of the real tofu.

 

Hiyayakko with natto
Hiyayakko with natto (fermented soy beans)

People are suspicious of tofu. And if they live outside of Asia, I don’t blame them. There is one thing that really bothers me about tofu in North America. It’s gross. I mean, I’ll eat it, and maybe even enjoy it… but I don’t consider it tofu. Here, soy bean curd is used as a meat substitute, whereas in Japan, tofu – soft, smooth, and rich with a mellow bean flavour – is enjoyed for it’s texture and delicate qualities. It’s eaten boiled, simmered, grilled, fried, as a drink and as a dessert custard. There are multiple course meals based around tofu and all its glory. It’s delicious. And if you really like tofu? You get raw, and top it.

Ingredients for Hiyayakko (per serving)

  • Chilled soft (silken) tofu. For this dish, it’s worth going to the Asian market for the real deal. If you can’t find soft tofu, do not substitute this with medium or firm tofu. Simply abort the mission until you find the good stuff.
  • Garnish of choice (see below for some suggestions)
  • Soy sauce or ponzu sauce (available at Japanese markets and many grocery stores)

How to make Hiyayakko:

  1. Carefully slide a single serving size of tofu onto a small side plate (first drain the water out of the package and cut the typical “square” of tofu into roughly 4 equal servings).  If you’d like, cut a grid into each serving, resulting in 4 or 6 bite-sized cubes.
  2. Top with your favourite garnish (see “Variations” section below)
  3. Pour on a little soy sauce or ponzu sauce to taste, adding wasabi paste if you like the kick.
  4. To eat, roll each cube in the sauce and enjoy with a little pile of the topping. YUM!

Variations for Hiyayakko toppings:

Katsuo-bushi (shaved bonito) and green onion

  • Sprinkle some katsuo-bushi on the tofu, and top with a little finely sliced green onion.
  • Serve with soy sauce and wasabi, if you like

Natto and green onion (pictured above)

  • Vigorously stir purchased natto (fermented soy beans – very stinky!) and pour over tofu.
  • Top with thinly sliced green onion.

Umeboshi and shiso with ponzu sauce (pictured below)

  • Finely slice shiso herb and place on tofu
  • Pit a couple of umeboshi and chop finely, until it becomes a paste. Place a dollop on top of the shiso nest, or place on the side to mix in with the ponzu (as you would wasabi in soy sauce)
  • Pour over a little ponzu, for dipping, to create a citrusy, fresh dish

Katsuo-bushi (shaved bonito) and white onion

  • Slice fresh white onion into paper thin slices, and soak in ice-cold water for at least 30 minutes (better to do this for an hour or more). Change the water a few times for best effect.
  • Drain and spin or pat onions dry, and make a beautiful pile on top of the tofu.
  • Sprinkle liberally with katsuo-bushi flakes
  • Serve with soy sauce

 

Hiyayakko with shiso and ume

Hiyayakko with shiso (perilla) herb and ume (sour plum) paste

Happy forking!

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One Response to “Tofu true love: Hiyayakko”

  1. Janice December 8, 2010 at 9:18 am #

    I know what I’m going to make this weekend. mmmm..

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